Category Archives: Conservation Grazing

Species in Focus; Chough

Chough Vaughn Matthews The chough is a member of the crow family, distinctive from others thanks to its red legs and beak. The chough has a slightly shyer nature than other crows. They can be seen from the Wales Coast Path performing aerial acrobatics and calling with their distinctive call. The

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Grazier of the Month; Sorcha and Brian Lewis

Meadow on the farm, Sorcha Lewis In 2019, we told you about some of the amazing grazing animals that are working on Brian and Sorcha Lewis conservation grazing projects across Wales. Now for 2020, we’d love to highlight some of the wonderful graziers who look after these animals. We are really

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Grazed coastal heath habitat, habitats such as these can attract funding

Habitat in Focus; Coastal heath

Grazed coastal heath Llyn Peninsula Coastal heath is classified as lowland heath, occurring at an altitude of 300m or below along the coastline of Wales. It is a broadly open landscape on impoverished, acidic mineral and shallow soil, characterised by over 25% cover of ericaceous shrubs Ponies conservation grazing Penmaen Burrows

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Grazier of the Month; Gemma Haines

Gemma Haines, Woolies Wellies and Wine In 2019, we told you about some of the amazing grazing animals that are working on conservation grazing projects across Wales. Now for 2020, we’d love to highlight some of the wonderful graziers who look after these animals. We are really proud to work with

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Species in Focus; Medicinal Leech

The medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis) is the UK’s largest leech species, at 16cm in length when fully extended. It is striking in colour, with stripes of red and yellow set on a black background. As suggested by the name, this is the leech of medieval medicine fame! The leech is still

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Habitat in Focus; Peat Bog

Peat bog is one of Wales’ priority habitats. A typical habitat of our uplands, peat bog/ blanket bog is typified by a thick base layer of peat which supports bog-mosses, heathers and cotton-grasses. The acidic nature of peat leads to an interesting matrix of plant species, including bog asphodel and insectivorous

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